How to Make a Flower Crown

I love making flower crowns! I mean, I love flowers in any format but there’s something really satisfying about making a flower crown, putting it on your head and pretending to be a fairy. Oh, wait, nobody else does that?

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In Israel a flower crown is the traditional and accepted head gear of any birthday girl or boy. You can buy a simple plastic crown with fabric flowers in the birthday section of even the smallest supermarket, but since I started making my own I can’t go back to the plastic ones. I’ve got a rep to protect.

Having made flower crowns a bunch of times now and seeing how easy it is, I will pretty much look for any excuse to make one. Flowers are not safe in my vicinity! Give me half a chance and I will literally start cutting their heads off and taping them to a piece of wire. True story.

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I like making crowns from fresh flowers but obviously they have a shelf life so I sometimes use this same technique to make them from fabric flowers. For Sophie’s mermaid Purim costume a couple of months ago I made the basic crown shape and then hot-glued on felt seaweed fronds and little starry flowers. There are tons of possibilities here.

This week, however, I actually have a legit reason to make a flower crown (rather than just the usual made-up excuse): the Jewish holiday of Shavuot (Pentecost) is coming up and all the kids at Sophie’s Waldorf kindergarten have to wear flower crowns as part of their celebration. Booya! (This may be the first time anyone has ever used the word ‘booya’ in the context of flower crowns).

This is how I did it.

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Supplies:

  1. Green florist wire (also available from florist shops)
  2. Green florist tape (also available from florist shops)
  3. Flowers and leaves with stems of at least 5cm (2 inches)
  4. Scissors (not pictured)

Note: The subject of wire gauges can become rather confusing but it doesn’t really need to be! I used a reasonably thick green enameled florist wire (see images above and below), which created a strong and sturdy crown. However, I have also had success using much thinner wire. The process of wrapping tape around the wire helps to strengthen the crown too. Basically, don’t sweat it too much if your wire is a bit thinner or thicker than the one I used. If you really want to get into the subject, this article is full of useful information.

Step 1: Measure out a length of florist wire that is long enough to wrap around your head twice. If you’re using shorter pieces of wire you can wrap the ends around each other to fasten them into one longer piece. I used a total length of 118cm (3.87 ft). If you’re making the crown for someone whose head is smaller than yours, don’t worry: the size of the crown can easily be adjusted once finished by folding and twisting the extra wire at the back of the head. If you’re making the crown for someone whose head is bigger than yours, you may have to estimate – or measure their head!

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Step 2: Wrap half the length of wire around your head once to form a circular crown shape and then take the remaining wire and wrap it all the way around the circle to strengthen it (see image above). You now have your basic crown shape.

Step 3: Cut a length of florist tape and wrap it all the way around the wire crown. This gives the crown a prettier smoother finish and also covers up any sharp edges (see image above). Now you’re ready to add the flowers!

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Step 4: If you have different sizes of flowers, choose one of the largest ones and snip the head off the stalk, leaving a stem of about 5cm (2 inches). Cut a length of florist tape and place the flower against the part of the wire crown that you want as the front. Starting at the base of the flower head, wrap the tape around and around the stem, fastening it to the wire.

Step 5: Take another large flower and do the same, placing it next to and facing the first flower. These two flowers will be right at the front of your crown, which is why it looks best if they’re the largest. Continue the process with your other flowers and leaves. You can do one side of the crown first and then the other, or you can do what I did and alternate between sides. Whatever rocks your party.

Step 6: Once you’ve fastened on a few flowers, you can try on the crown and see how many more you want to add. It’s best to leave some bare wire at the back of your head so that the size of the crown can be adjusted easily. I used 9 flower heads and a similar number of leaves to fill up the crown on the front and sides of my head.

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Step 7: Voila! Your finished crown! You can make these flower crowns a day in advance and place them in plastic bags in the fridge until you need them, thereby reducing last-minute flower crown stress! (That’s a thing, right?)

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And here’s Sophie yesterday taking the role of ‘dancer’ and wearing the crown at her kindergarten’s beautiful Shavuot celebration!

If you’ve ever admired the boho look of fresh flower crowns (or maybe you’ve been overusing Snapchat’s flower crown PNG and are ready for an IRL upgrade) I invite you to try our tutorial! It might become your new favourite addiction.

 

The Olive Branch: April

Spring is swiftly moving towards summer and today (in mid-May) we’ve got temperatures of 36 celsius! Better have a quick look back at April before spring becomes a far-off memory and I forget what the colour green looks like (Israeli summers have a rather yellow/brown tint!).

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This and the first pic are from a little hike we did up Napolean Hill in an area called Rosh Tzipor (Bird Head) in north Tel Aviv. I love these little pockets of wild nature in the middle of the city.

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We celebrated Passover with Tom’s kindergarten by going on a trip to Sharon Beach just up the coast. It was a lot of fun and a little bit wacky as we all dressed up as Moses and his followers and pretended to be fleeing Egypt. Tom made just about the cutest little Moses I’ve ever seen 🙂

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I enjoyed using these vintage bone china dessert plates my parents brought over when they visited. They used to belong to my Nan so they’re very special to me. Just one look at those blue cornflowers and I’m back in my grandparents’ dining room with the net curtains and the electric organ in the corner, drinking tea and eating trifle!

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We shared a recipe for Coconut Cream Malabi, a traditional Middle Eastern dessert which is very trendy in Tel Aviv at the moment. It’s ridiculously easy to make and absolutely delicious! This version is vegan too…

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My little dreamer…

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We went on an epic camping trip in the desert with old friends. There was running through sprinklers, ibex and camel spotting, TWO glorious desert water holes, a bedouin tent, barbecues and toasted marshmallows… but most importantly amazing company. Miss you already, Jess and Jo!

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And finally, I picked up Middlemarch again – a book which I can honestly say has made me a better person, as well as being a jolly good read. Click through to find out how much this book means to me!

What else? A new haircut, a new capsule wardrobe, a karaoke night, a LOT of school holiday (tiring!) and lots of house viewings (but I think we might have found the one…).

How was your April?

Love Em xx