Sesame-Pistachio Cauliflower Burritos with Simple Salsa

I tried hard not to jump on the taco bandwagon. Really, I did. Instead I made burritos. 🙂 You can call them wraps if you like, I won’t judge. Either way, despite the fact that mastering the wrapping technique has taken me most of my adult life (tip: though you may want to pile in a mountain of filling, don’t), I think you’ll find that these babies are easier to hold and eat without various delicious sauces dribbling down to your elbows than are the more slapdash tacos (no offense; I love you, tacos!).

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Actually, if you want to get all technical, these are probably not ‘real’ burritos. They contain no meat, beans or cheese. In fact, they’re vegan – although you could totally play around and add massive handfuls of mozzarella as per the recipe I based this on. Being a bit of a cheese fiend, I would personally be totally up for this. I was, however, called on to provide a vegan main for a family holiday dinner and I think that the substitution of massive handfuls of grated tofu is both wholly satisfying and similarly protein-y (though not as melty).

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This recipe was adapted and veganized from a quesadilla recipe created by Miriam Kasin Hospodar, which appears in her Ayurvedic vegetarian cookbook, Heaven’s Banquet. It’s a massive book containing over 700 vegetarian recipes inspired by numerous food cultures and, as well as giving a useful introduction to the Ayurvedic approach to wellbeing through diet, it is also full of delightfully quirky little stories and nuggets of wisdom, both culinary and otherwise.

Sesame-Pistachio Cauliflower Burritos

SERVES 8

PREPARATION AND COOKING TIME: 50-60 MINS

Ingredients

Burritos

Approx 5 tbsp olive oil

3 tbsp sesame seeds

1 tbsp nigella seeds

6 cloves garlic, finely chopped

2 tbsp fresh ginger, finely chopped

2 tsp whole mustard seeds

4 tsp whole cumin seeds

One medium-sized head of cauliflower, finely chopped

2-3 red peppers, thinly sliced

Soya sauce

Salt and black pepper

Approx 10 sundried tomatoes, thinly sliced

60g / 2oz shelled roasted pistachios, roughly chopped

300g / 10.5oz firm tofu

50g / 2oz spring onions, chopped

8 large flour tortillas

Simple Salsa

8 ripe tomatoes

1/4 of a small onion

Juice of 1 lemon or lime

3 tbsp olive oil

Handful of fresh coriander, leaves and stalks

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 200°C / 400°F / Gas 6. Place a large frying pan over a medium heat. When it is warm, add 4 tbsp of the olive oil, followed by the sesame and nigella seeds. Sauté the seeds over a medium-low heat until the sesame takes on some colour. Then add the garlic, ginger, mustard seeds and cumin seeds and sauté everything, stirring, for about 30 seconds.
  2. Turn the heat up to medium-high. Add the cauliflower and red peppers to the pan, sprinkle with soya sauce and some black pepper and stir to combine. Cover with a lid and reduce the heat to medium-low. Let the vegetables cook gently in their own juices, stirring occasionally, until the cauliflower is tender, about 10 minutes.

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  1. Stir in the sundried tomatoes and pistachios. Leave the pan uncovered on a low heat, stirring occasionally, until the cauliflower browns a little bit.
  2. Meanwhile, wrap the block of tofu in paper towel and squeeze out as much liquid as possible. Coarsely grate the tofu and add to the pan. Stir and check the seasoning. Add a little more soya sauce or salt if needed.

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  1. Remove from the heat. Set some of the spring onions aside for a garnish and stir the rest into the pan.
  2. Place a tortilla flat on a plate or chopping board. Put 5 tbsp of the cauliflower mix in the centre of the tortilla (see pic below). Fold in the sides of the tortilla. Fold up the bottom quarter of the tortilla so it covers about half of the mix. Fold the bottom part of the tortilla up again so all the mix is enclosed inside. Place, open side down, in a baking tray. Repeat with the other tortillas.

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  1. Brush the burritos with the remaining olive oil and bake in the oven for 10 minutes until they turn a light golden colour.
  2. Garnish the burritos with the remaining spring onion and serve with the simple salsa on the side.

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I find that the textural combination of the finely chopped cauliflower with the nuts and seeds almost mimics that of minced beef but the result is a far lighter, fresher and less oily burrito. Try them and let us know what you think!

Delicious Hearty Vegan Sesame-Pistachio Cauliflower Burritos with Simple Salsa

Coconut Cream Malabi

Malabi. I’m willing to bet that there isn’t a single trendy Tel Aviv restaurant that hasn’t got its own version of Malabi on its dessert menu at the moment. Certainly this post was inspired by all the various delicious Malabi (Malabis? Malabim?? Help, grammar gods…) I’ve daintily dipped my spoon into recently (by which I mean, attacked with an amount of energy and gusto that usually requires hydraulics).

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If you’ve never come across it before, Malabi, or Muhallebi, is a cold custard-like dessert, similar in texture to Pannacotta or Blancmange. It’s very popular in Israel, but can be found all over the Middle East and North Africa. Though the main ingredients (cream, sugar and cornflour) are fairly standard, the flavourings and toppings can vary. I’ve eaten Malabi flavoured with vanilla, rosewater, orange flower water, cardamom… I’ve devoured it topped with rose syrup, strawberry syrup, date syrup, pomegranate syrup… I’ve scoffed it sprinkled with cinnamon, powdered with peanuts, anointed with almonds, covered with coconut and pimped with pistachios. So far I’ve not had it with all of the above all at the same time. But tomorrow is another day.

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I had the perfect opportunity to crack the Malabi code when we had Mr Olive’s family over for dinner recently. Since my sister- and brother-in-law are vegan, I went ahead and replaced the cream with coconut cream. Almond or other non-dairy milks could also be used, but then the result would be less creamy. And we all like creamy.

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I adore both rosewater and orange flower water so choosing between them was pure agony (I never ever exaggerate) but in the end I went for the more classic rosewater. I figure this is only the first of many Malabis (Malabies? Ick, no, that sounds like a disease) I’m going to make so there’ll be plenty of time for all the other variations 🙂

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And then I decided to throw vanilla and cardamom in there too because I simply couldn’t bring myself to give up on either of them. Perish the thought!

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For toppings, I chose date syrup, known in Israel as Silan, since it reminds me of the marvelous Malabi Mr Olive and I used to scarf down at Hummus Bros in London’s Soho. It can usually be found in whole food shops. Then, toasted desiccated coconut (because it’s traditional and because it’s yummy), and chopped almonds (because they’re delicious and nutritious) and pistachios (because I can’t resist that pop of green).

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And I almost forgot to mention how easy Malabi is to make. It’s basically as easy as throwing a few things together in a pot, bringing them to the boil and stirring them. Then pouring the lot into jars and sticking them in the fridge for a few hours. Ta-da: a new fancy summertime dinner party dessert… that your guests will go nuts for! Pretty sweet!

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Coconut Cream Malabi

SERVES 4-6

4 HOURS, 20 MINS

PREPARATION TIME: 20 MINUTES

CHILLING TIME: 4 HOURS, OR OVERNIGHT

Ingredients

Malabi

3 cups / 710 ml coconut cream,

5 tbsp corn flour,

3 tbsp rosewater,

5 tbsp white sugar,

1 tsp vanilla extract,

1/4 tsp cardamom seeds, ground or crushed,

Toppings

Date syrup to taste (I used 2 tbsp per serving),

1-2 handfuls of almonds,

1-2 handfuls of pistachios, shelled,

Approx 4 tbsp dessicated coconut,

Method

  1. In a medium-sized bowl, whisk half a cup of the coconut cream with the corn flour, rosewater and vanilla until smooth.
  2. Put the remaining 2 1/2 cups of coconut cream in a small saucepan together with the sugar and cardamom and bring to the boil, stirring occasionally.
  3. Add the corn flour mixture, reduce the heat and simmer, whisking vigorously, for about 1 minute, until the Malabi thickens and there are no lumps.
  4. Pour into serving dishes or small glass jars and bring to room temperature. Then chill in the fridge for at least 4 hours, or overnight.
  5. While the Malabi is chilling, prepare the toppings. Toast the almonds and pistachios in a dry frying pan over a low heat. Watch them closely so they don’t burn!
  6. Place the toasted nuts in a food processor and pulse until they are finely chopped.
  7. Toast the desiccated coconut gently in a dry frying pan over a low heat, stirring often so it doesn’t burn. Remove from the pan as soon as it starts to turn golden (if your kitchen didn’t already smell amazing, it will now).
  8. When you are ready to serve, top each Malabi with a couple of tablespoons of date syrup, and a teaspoonful or so each of coconut and nuts.
  9. Yum!

The Olive Branch: January

So the first month of 2017 has come and gone and if the photos I’ve taken this month are anything to go by, it seems like our January was mainly filled with baking sweet treats, eating aforementioned treats and then hiking in the countryside to make our bodies think the sweet treats never happened.

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At the beginning of the month I shared my go-to cookie recipe: Chocolate Chip Raisin Oat Cookies. Yummy, simple to make and not even really all that bad for you (ignore the butter, ignore the butter… what? Of course I wasn’t trying to send you a subliminal message). Bake up a batch and then you won’t have to offer your guests your kids’ Pez sweets as refreshment.

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Also, I tidied up Sophie and Tom’s shared bedroom so I could share this Kids’ Room Tour and it stayed tidy from the exact moment I finished tidying it until the exact moment the kids entered it. Sisyphus, I feel ya.

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We took a couple of lovely trips out of the city. This one was our hike at Yaqum Lake in the centre of Israel. It’s a lake that only exists in the winter, after the rains begin. Tom enjoyed scanning the wide skies for airplanes.

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I bought a new plant! Such an indulgence, I know. It’s a Mother-in-Law’s Tongue (Sanseviera) and here it is peeking out from behind the lamp. Apparently it’s one of those ones that’s impossible to kill. We’ll see. Already this month we had some crazy strong winds which literally dislodged our window boxes and smashed them onto the ground below (we live on the fourth floor). Only the lemon geranium survived… sniff sniff.

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We did another trip up to the Carmel region to Ramat Hanadiv, a nature park with formal gardens and a separate wilder section with hiking trails. We loved the rose garden, which was in full bloom – it’s always funny for me to see flowers and plants that I associate with summer thriving in the Mediterranean winter! By the way, the pink roses smelled the sweetest. No surprise there then. #ihavethisthingwithpink

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In important family news, Mr Olive’s sister gave birth to their first baby and I’m so looking forward to all the cuddles! I baked this Vegan Chilled Chocolate Torte with Toasted Hazlenut Crust to celebrate (my sister-in-law and her husband are vegan so we eat a lot of plant-based food in our family). I based the recipe on one from the first Oh She Glows cookbook (which was a gift from Ave, incidentally ♥ ♥ ♥ ). Let me know in the comments if you’d like me to post the recipe!

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And finally, right at the tail end of the month, I finally got round to posting the recipe for Savta Clara’s Tomato, Carrot and Rice Soup. It’s a winter warmer that packs a lemony peppery punch and it’s an old family recipe passed down by Mr Olive’s granny. Generations of soup-lovers can’t be wrong!

Apart from that I went on a girls’ karaoke night, had a date night with Mr Olive, added a few more rows to a scarf I’m knitting (first ever knitting project – wish me luck!), signed a fair few petitions – no need to guess the subject 😦 – and, as always, did a sh*tload of laundry!

So how about you? How was your start to 2017?

Em xx

Savta Clara’s Tomato, Carrot and Rice Soup

Back in November I posted a recipe for Savta Shifra’s Vegetable Soup, the best vegetable soup out there, in my opinion! Now, as promised, I’m back with a soup recipe from a different Savta (‘savta’ means ‘granny’ in Hebrew). Savta Clara was Mr Olive’s granny on his mother’s side and her famous winter soup is a winner: a zingy combination of tomato, carrot and rice with an energizing hit of lemon, pepper and fresh herbs.

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Forget your sweet cloying Cream of Tomato (although I do have a soft spot for the Heinz tinned kind!); Savta Clara’s tomato soup is an entirely different beast. Despite the satisfying addition of rice, this soup feels light, invigorating, rejuvenating. I kind of see it as the vegetarian equivalent of the classic clear chicken noodle soup. If you’re suffering from the winter woozies and you’re not a chicken soup fan, THIS is the soup recipe you need to get you high-kicking again. I’m actually eating a bowl of it as I write this, and, wow, is it ever clearing my sinuses!

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A little background on Clara: she was born in 1917 in Bacău, a town in the east of Romania. She was a mischievous child and, by her own account, rather tested her parents’ patience. “If they threw me out the door, I’d come back in through the window,” she said. “And if they threw me out the window, I’d climb back in down the chimney.” Clara always loved to travel and she first visited Israel in her early 20s. While there she studied agriculture under the Meshek Hapoalot scheme, which prepared young immigrant women for their new non-traditional roles as farm labourers in the kibbutz and moshav communities.

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On finishing her program, she returned to Romania, where she married her hardworking and good-hearted husband, Itzchak, and gave birth to their first daughter, Nurit. But in 1950 Clara returned to Israel with her family, this time for good. They lived first in the north of the country before eventually settling in the vibrant city of Tel Aviv. They had a wide social circle, mostly composed of other immigrants from Romania, and every Friday evening they would meet with friends to listen to music, dance and play cards.

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Clara was known for her ‘golden hands’ and her ability to excel at all kinds of crafts including sewing, knitting and embroidery. My mother-in-law, Irit, describes her as a serious but sweet and loving mother with exceptional organizational and culinary skills, and she and Mr Olive often recall their regular Saturday meal at Savta Clara’s, when she would serve borsht, peppery schnitzel and kasha.

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And, of course, this Tomato, Carrot and Rice Soup. Warming and comforting, with a kick of citrus, this is the soup that Mr Olive requests on dark rainy winter days, especially when he’s got a touch of the Man Flu. And now you can enjoy it too! Sniffles optional 🙂

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Savta Clara’s Tomato, Carrot and Rice Soup

MAKES 1 POT

PREPARATION AND COOKING TIME: 35-40 MINS

Thanks to my mother-in-law, Irit, for passing this recipe down to me and for sharing stories of her mother, Clara.

Ingredients

3 medium carrots

1 medium onion

2 tbsp olive oil

One large handful each of fresh parsley, dill and celery leaf, including stalks (do not chop the herbs)

500 ml / 2 cups tomato juice

100g / 1/2 cup white rice

Juice of 1 lemon

Salt, black pepper and sugar to taste

Method

  1. Boil the kettle.
  2. Coarsely grate one of the carrots and slice or finely chop the other two.
  3. Finely chop the onion.
  4. Heat the olive oil in a large pot over a medium heat. Add the vegetables, cover, and sweat on a low heat for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  5. Pour boiling water into the pot, to about the halfway mark.
  6. Add the bunches of parsley, dill and celery leaves and cover.
  7. Bring to the boil and cook, covered, for 10 minutes. Then, using kitchen tongs, remove the herbs and discard.
  8. Add the tomato juice and bring to the boil again.
  9. Add the rice, cover, and simmer on a low heat for 5-10 minutes, until the rice is cooked.
  10. Add the lemon juice and season to taste with salt, pepper and sugar. You can afford to be generous with the lemon and pepper, since the citrus and heat are what gives this soup so much zing and pep!
  11. Treat yourself to a big bowlful on a dark and rainy winter day.

 

 

Savta Shifra’s Vegetable Soup

Autumn is here and our thoughts turn to soup. (Re-reading that, it makes it sound like our thoughts sort of liquefy and become all runny and soft. This may well be the case but it’s NOT WHAT I MEANT!) In Tel Aviv today it is almost the middle of November and a not-very-chilly 28 degrees centigrade outside, so this whole autumny-soupy vibe I’ve got going may have a lot more to do with wishful thinking than an actual need to warm ourselves from the inside out. Still though, I hear we’ll have temperatures as low as 23C in a week from now, so all is not lost.

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In my husband’s family there are two soups which make a regular appearance throughout the cold (ha!) autumn and winter seasons. One of these is Savta Shifra’s Vegetable Soup. (The other is Savta Clara’s Tomato Rice soup, which will surely find its way onto the blog at some point in the dark freezing [ha ha!] months to come). It is, in my opinion, the definitive vegetable soup. Almost, but not quite, a clear soup, it is green with herbs, a tiny bit spicy, a lot vegetabley and extremely moreish. Eating a bowl of it offers an experience which is somehow at the same time rigorously cleansing and deeply comforting – two sensations I expect many of us are craving in the light of recent global events.

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A little about its distinguished creator: Savta Shifra (‘savta’ means ‘granny’ in Hebrew) was my husband’s father’s mother. Born in Lublin, Poland, in 1914, she came to Israel at the age of 20 with her sister to study agriculture. This decision was to save her life: all her family who stayed behind in Poland were killed in the Holocaust.

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Blonde, blue-eyed Shifra studied and worked in the fields in the centre of Israel, where her shorts-clad legs were apparently the talk of the region. She was, by all accounts, a remarkable woman: gracious and charming, hardworking, kind, the sort who made the best out of things, and who, together with her husband David, devotedly raised three sons (and a lot of chickens) on a smallholding in a neighbourhood which is now part of north Tel Aviv, but was then a small village. My hubby spent a lot of time with his grandparents as a child and gets rather uncharacteristically wistful and dreamy-eyed when he recalls the afternoons spent in their garden hunting for bugs, or walking back to his grandparents’ house through the winter rain after judo practice to be welcomed by a steaming hot bowl of soup. For Savta Shifra was also a legendary cook.

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And this is her soup. Hearty yet refreshing. Full of deep vegetable flavour with just a hint of ‘picante’ from the curry powder. Thickened with oats, freshened with parsley and dill, it is the soup I dream of on cold wet days and the one I always secretly hope my mother-in-law will be serving at our weekly family lunches.

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Savta Shifra’s Vegetable Soup

MAKES 1 LARGE POT

PREPARATION AND COOKING TIME: 45-50 MINS

Many thanks to my mother-in-law, Irit, for passing the recipe down to me. The original recipe uses butter for sauteeing the vegetables but feel free to substitute olive oil to make a vegan soup.

Ingredients

2 large onions, cut into 1cm dice

3 medium carrots, peeled and cut into 1cm dice

3 medium courgettes or zucchini, cut into 1cm dice (the pale green variety are more common in Israel so these are what I used. Feel free to substitute the dark green or yellow-skinned variety)

2 medium potatoes, peeled and cut into 1cm dice

50g (1.8oz) unsalted butter (or substitute a couple of tablespoons of olive oil for a vegan version)

4 tbsp porridge oats

Salt and pepper to taste

1 tbsp sweet paprika, or to taste

1 tbsp curry powder, or to taste

1 tbsp turmeric

1 tbsp mushroom stock powder

1 tbsp chicken or vegetable stock powder

4 or 5 handfuls of mixed frozen vegetables. (Use whatever you have on hand: green beans, chickpeas, peas, sweetcorn, broccoli etc.)

3 tbsp soya sauce

Small handful of parsley, finely chopped

Small handful of dill, finely chopped

 

Method

  1. Boil the kettle. Melt the butter in a large pot over a medium heat. Add the porridge oats and stir to coat.
  2. Add all the vegetables to the pot, stir, and then pour in enough boiling water to fill the pot two thirds full.
  3. Stir in salt, pepper, paprika, curry powder, turmeric, and the stock powders.
  4. Cover the pot and simmer for 15 minutes.
  5. While the soup is simmering, boil the kettle again. Place the frozen vegetables in a colander and rinse thoroughly, first under the cold tap and then in the boiled water from the kettle. Drain well.
  6. When the 15 minutes are up, add the semi-defrosted vegetables to the pot, stir, and simmer, covered, for another 5-7 minutes.
  7. Stir in the soya sauce, parsley and dill, let simmer for another couple of minutes so the flavours combine and then taste to check seasoning. Add more salt if necessary – I usually find that none is needed, since the salt, stock powders and soya sauce added earlier result in a soup which is already just the right amount of salty! Serve very hot.